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All the latest from The Guayusa Co

Unearthing more of guayusa's story

Our last blog went down really well, and we certainly enjoyed writing it - so much so that we have another article along the same lines - one that delves into other lesser known corners of the mysterious and wonderful guayusa plant.

Last time we finished up talking about how the recorded use of Guayusa fell quiet after the abandonment of the Jesuit missionaries - this is obviously not to say that local communities stopped using it, for the Bishop of Cuenca, Manuel Plaza, reported in 1854 that the Jivaroan peoples were still cultivating guayusa near their houses.

The story can be picked again when we learn that, in 1857, the English botanist, Richard Spruce (which we think is a great name for a botanist!), saw that Guayusa was still being grown and used by these same peoples south of the town of Banos, in Antombes.

Read more

Our last blog went down really well, and we certainly enjoyed writing it - so much so that we have another article along the same lines - one that delves into other lesser known corners of the mysterious and wonderful guayusa plant.

Last time we finished up talking about how the recorded use of Guayusa fell quiet after the abandonment of the Jesuit missionaries - this is obviously not to say that local communities stopped using it, for the Bishop of Cuenca, Manuel Plaza, reported in 1854 that the Jivaroan peoples were still cultivating guayusa near their houses.

The story can be picked again when we learn that, in 1857, the English botanist, Richard Spruce (which we think is a great name for a botanist!), saw that Guayusa was still being grown and used by these same peoples south of the town of Banos, in Antombes.

Read more


Learning more about the story of guayusa

You may or may not have noticed that once you scratch the surface, there does not seem to be a great deal of literature about the history or more traditional uses of guayusa.

 Those of us who have tried it have our direct knowledge of drinking it and, for the writers of this page, feel the benefits of drinking guayusa as a healthy alternative to coffee.

There is also a substantial amount of information easily available online from trusted sources and authorities about the tea (e.g. Wikipedia, Runa).

We have looked a bit deeper and found some publications that delve further into guayusa's story.

Some of these publications were written as long ago as 1978 and the documents themselves pull together snippets of information about guayusa from many other significantly older writings.

We've unearthed some of these treasures in this blog and hope to continue it as a series.

Read more

You may or may not have noticed that once you scratch the surface, there does not seem to be a great deal of literature about the history or more traditional uses of guayusa.

 Those of us who have tried it have our direct knowledge of drinking it and, for the writers of this page, feel the benefits of drinking guayusa as a healthy alternative to coffee.

There is also a substantial amount of information easily available online from trusted sources and authorities about the tea (e.g. Wikipedia, Runa).

We have looked a bit deeper and found some publications that delve further into guayusa's story.

Some of these publications were written as long ago as 1978 and the documents themselves pull together snippets of information about guayusa from many other significantly older writings.

We've unearthed some of these treasures in this blog and hope to continue it as a series.

Read more


Great video about the production of Guayusa by Runa

This is an interesting video that gives an insight into how guayusa is used traditionally in Ecuador.

It also goes into good detail on how Runa have set up an amazing factory that produces Fair Trade, non GMO and organic guayusa tea that we know tastes and feels great - because we drink it everyday ourselves!


Read more

This is an interesting video that gives an insight into how guayusa is used traditionally in Ecuador.

It also goes into good detail on how Runa have set up an amazing factory that produces Fair Trade, non GMO and organic guayusa tea that we know tastes and feels great - because we drink it everyday ourselves!


Read more


L-Theanine - a goddess in the guayusa?

We thought we'd continue our series of blogs that look further into the chemical composition of guayusa by focusing next on L-Theanine.

We didn't do Latin at school, but we now know that the 'Theo' in theobromine (a stimulant also found in guayusa) means 'God' so, we think, 'Thea' could mean its feminine equivalent - a goddess.

L-Theanine is found in various plants and fungal species, and was uncovered as a constituent of green tea all the way back in 1949. It is also present in black and white teas to a volume of about 1% of the dried weight.

Read more

We thought we'd continue our series of blogs that look further into the chemical composition of guayusa by focusing next on L-Theanine.

We didn't do Latin at school, but we now know that the 'Theo' in theobromine (a stimulant also found in guayusa) means 'God' so, we think, 'Thea' could mean its feminine equivalent - a goddess.

L-Theanine is found in various plants and fungal species, and was uncovered as a constituent of green tea all the way back in 1949. It is also present in black and white teas to a volume of about 1% of the dried weight.

Read more


Guayusa: Food of the gods

We thought it would be quite interesting to learn a little more and write about some of the magical properties of guayusa tea.

One of the well known stimulants in guayusa is, of course, caffeine. But there's another kind of stimulant hidden inside this wonder plant, called 'Theobromine'.

Theobromine is commonly found in chocolate, and is scientifically classified as a 'xanthine alkaloid' (which is, interestingly, also what caffeine is classed under).

Theobromine itself works to stimulate the body in a similar way to caffeine - but is less intense. It was first discovered as a compound way back in 1841 by a chemist from Russia called Alexander Voskresensky.

Read more

We thought it would be quite interesting to learn a little more and write about some of the magical properties of guayusa tea.

One of the well known stimulants in guayusa is, of course, caffeine. But there's another kind of stimulant hidden inside this wonder plant, called 'Theobromine'.

Theobromine is commonly found in chocolate, and is scientifically classified as a 'xanthine alkaloid' (which is, interestingly, also what caffeine is classed under).

Theobromine itself works to stimulate the body in a similar way to caffeine - but is less intense. It was first discovered as a compound way back in 1841 by a chemist from Russia called Alexander Voskresensky.

Read more